After more than a year of campaigning to convince the U.S. Treasury to replace the portrait of Andrew Jackson on the $20 bill with the face of a female American hero, Women On 20s is celebrating the Treasury Department’s decision to accelerate production of a new $20 bill, revealing its design in time for the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage in 2020 and working with the Federal Reserve Board to fast-track its issuance into circulation.

1. Harriet Tubman was born Araminta Ross. She would later adopt the name “Harriet” after her mother: Harriet Ross. The surname Tubman comes from her first husband, John Tubman, who she married in 1844.

2. Harriet was born a slave and raised Harriet_Tubman_by_Squyer_NPG_c1885on Maryland’s Eastern Shore where the lines between slavery and freedom were often blurred. It was not unusual for families in this area to include both free and enslaved members. Harriet’s own husband, John Tubman was a free black man. Her status, however, remained unchanged until she fled to Pennsylvania – a free state – in 1849. Her husband did not make the journey and ultimately re-married after Harriet’s departure.

3. Harriet would return to Maryland many times over the next decade to rescue both family and non-famly members from the bondages of slavery.

4. Harriet earned the nickname “Moses” after the prophet Moses in the Bible who led his people to freedom.  In all of her journeys she “never lost a single passenger.”

5. Tubman’s work was a constant threat to her own freedom and safety. Slave holders placed a bounty for her capture and the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 was an ever-present danger, imposing severe punishments on any person who assisted the escape of a slave.

6. Harriet wore many hats:  She was an active proponent of women’s suffrage and worked alongside women such as side Susan B. Anthony. During the civil war, Harriet also worked for the Union Army as a cook, a nurse and even a spy.

7. Harriet was acquainted with leading abolitionists of the day, including John Brown who conferred with “General Tubman” about his plans to raid Harpers Ferry.

8. Harriet had one daughter, Gertie, whom she and her second husband (Nelson Davis) adopted after the Civil war.

9. Harriet suffered life-long headaches, seizures and had vivid dreams as a result of a traumatic head injury she suffered as a teenager while trying to stand up for a fellow field hand. These same symptoms gave her powerful visions that she ascribed to God and helped guide her on many trips to the North while leading others to freedom.

10. Just before Harriet’s death in 1913 she told friends and family, “I go to prepare a place for you.”  She was buried with military honors in Fort Hill Cemetery in New York.

NO COMMENTS

LEAVE A REPLY